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What Screenwriters Are Being Judged On

As a screenwriter, you’re being judged in three different categories.


by Steve Kaire

The first is your material. When you’re in a pitch session, it’s your ideas and stories which are going to make an impression on the listener. Ask yourself these questions: Is your story unique? Are you approaching it from a different angle than we’ve seen before? In other words, does it have a hook? Producers and agents say that 80% of all material they read has a weak premise. And a weak premise at its core, no matter how well executed, is still a weak pr63-1013tm-cart-professionalsemise.

The second category you’re being judged upon is your presentation. How well do you pitch your project and do you conduct yourself in a professional manner? Is your title too generic or confusing? Are you clear on exactly what genre your material is? Is your logline intriguing and succinct?

Producers and agents say that 80% of all material they read has a weak premise.

The final category you’re being judged on is your understanding of how the business actually works. Even if your material and presentation are solid, how easy are you to work with? Are you too rigid to make changes that are asked of you? Are your expectations about money and credits within the standard parameters of the industry? And are you making unrealistic demands including wanting to direct or star in your script? If so, all your doing is sabotaging your career.

All of these areas are covered in depth on my High Concept CD for the cost of a pair of movie tickets. Information is power, arm yourself.

– Steve Kaire

 

[box] SteveKaireSteve Kaire is a Screenwriter/Pitchman who’s sold 8 projects to the major studios without representation. The last project he sold, he’s Co-Producing for Walden Media. A screenwriter for over 30 years, he holds a Masters in Dramatic Writing and has taught writing classes at the American Film Institute.
Steve was featured on the Tonight Show’s, “Pitching to America” and was voted a Star Speaker at Screenwriters Expo three years in a row. His top rated CD, “High Concept – How to Create, Pitch & Sell to Hollywood” is a best seller. You can find his website here.

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About the Author

Jamie Campbell

Jamie Campbell is an author, screenwriter, and television addict.Jamie is proud to be an Editor for The Story Department.Her latest series Project Integrate is out now.

Comments 1

  1. Steve Kaire’s three points are all valid. Being easy to work with, for example, is very important during the development process. The stereotypical prima donna artist may make for a dramatic character in a story, but behaving in this way to producers is a sure-fire way of making yourself avoided in the real world of the film buisness.

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